Alchemist's Tablet
Welcome Guest;

- Press 'Log In' If you already have an account on the forum to view the full functions as a member.

- Press 'Register' to create your own personalized account and be part of the alchemical participants.

Remember the main Topic Links like: (Spiritual Alchemy, Practical Alchemy, Astrology, etc), are build as blogs for members to post their ideas in a more expanded view. Than there are the smaller Links like: (magic, Equipment, Medicine, Books & Authors, etc), that are build as forums for members to discuss further in that specific manner.
I would recommend any new member to surf around the forum, explore on the topics before wanting to make a post.
Anything you wish to discuss about relating to the forum or you have any suggestions please send me a PM about it.

Thank you and Enjoy.

Mandrake (Mandragora)

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Mandrake (Mandragora)

Post by Agrimony on Tue Dec 03, 2013 1:14 pm

Mandrake is the common name for members of the plant genus Mandragora, particularly the species Mandragora officinarum, belonging to the nightshades family (Solanaceae). Because mandrake contains deliriant hallucinogenic tropane alkaloids such as atropine, scopolamine, apoatropine, hyoscyamine and the roots sometimes contain bifurcations causing them to resemble human figures, their roots have long been used in magic rituals, today also in contemporary pagan traditions such as Wicca and Odinism.

Description
It has a large, brown root, somewhat like a parsnip, running 3 or 4 feet deep into the ground, sometimes single and sometimes divided into two or three branches. Immediately from the crown of the root arise several large, dark-green leaves, which at first stand erect, but when grown to full size a foot or more in length and 4 or 5 inches in width - spread open and lie upon the ground. They are sharp pointed at the apex and of a foetid odour. From among these leaves spring the flowers, each on a separate foot-stalk, 3 or 4 inches high. They are somewhat of the shape and size of a primrose, the corolla bell-shaped, cut into five spreading segments, of a whitish colour, somewhat tinged with purple. They are succeeded by a smooth, round fruit, about as large as a small apple, of a deep yellow colour when ripe, full of pulp and with a strong, apple-like scent.

Medical Use
The leaves are quite harmless and cooling, and have been used for ointments and other external application. Boiled in milk and used as a poultice, they were employed by Boerhaave as an application to indolent ulcers.

The root is a powerful emetic and hallucinogen and if used internally, only with great caution, if at all. It is said in large doses to incite delirium and madness, though it was once used as a sleep aid, for those who were in too much pain to sleep. Pieces were also given patients to chew when they were about to undergo surgery.

Externally, the roots combined with alcohol make a rub for rheumatism.

This plant is poison!

History and Folklore
The name Mandragora comes from the Greek meaning "hurtful to cattle".

The Anglo-Saxons considered mandrake, as well as periwinkle, the definitive herbs for use in cases of demonic possession.

Mandrake root was imagined by the ancients to look human in form and was often pictured in various texts as a man with a very long beard, or a woman with a very bushy head of hair. If the root was split into two, it was considered female. If not, it was male. The Female roots were the most valuable and believed to be a useful charm to promote luck and wealth.

The plant was said to grow under the gallows of murderers, sprung from the bodily drippings of criminals and to shriek when dug up. The sound would kill a man or drive him insane. So, to avoid this fate, you were supposed to tie a dog to the plant and he would pull it up and die in the man's place. Some legends say that you could harvest only after sunset, or that you must draw a circlei with a sword or wandi three times around the plant before harvesting. Once harvested, a witch must wash it in wine and wrap it in silk for storage.

Little dolls were sometimes made of mandrake roots and kept to aid the household and answer important questions. Possession of one of these mandrake dolls could be used as evidence during witch trials.

Mandrakes are mentioned in the Bible; Leah bought a night with Jacob from Rachel with some Mandrakes which Rachel wanted to help her conceive. It may also have been mentioned in the Song of Solomon.

READ MORE: HERE and HERE
avatar
Agrimony
Admin

Posts : 57

http://alchemists.7forum.net

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum